In the digital age, content creators have emerged as powerful storytellers, shaping narratives and influencing the public. But with great reach comes great responsibility.

That’s why Climate Tracker Asia, in partnership with Oxfam, created a program that equips them with the tools they need to become not just talented creators, but informed digital storytellers.

For the second cycle of our Content Creators Hub program, we have gathered a diverse group of fellows from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. From a molecular biologist who demystifies the science behind skincare products to a photojournalist capturing the changing planet, each fellow brings their advocacy and talent to the table.

Our fellows underwent a series of online and in-person sessions on visual storytelling, creation of viral content, and climate journalism.
Meet our fellows who are united by one purpose: to wield the power of storytelling in the fight against the climate crisis.

Indonesia

Alief Aurum, 25

Alief is a motion graphics designer who loves to eat ayam geprek. He loves to watch movies, except films with bad reviews on IMDB.

Alief mostly produces explainers, documentaries, and in-depth news.

“Storytelling this urgency can raise awareness among those people to change their behavior so others will not suffer more severely.”

Anggrita Desyani Cahyaningtyas, 34

After starting her career as a journalist, Anggrita then changed her gear and became a communication specialist or science communicator. She has worked with various governmental and non-governmental entities in projects related to climate change, environment, health, and science and technology.

She believes in the power of communication to bridge science and society, and to drive knowledge-informed policies.

“Climate change is a complex issue and therefore it is important to translate them into messages that are relatable and easy-to-understand. Indonesia is unfortunately affected much by the crisis, as it faces long drought but also frequent flood, wildfires, and rising sea-level, just to name a few. Yet we also have indigenous wisdoms and the potential to be the change-maker.”

Suciati Agustin, 25

Suciati, usually called “Mother of Dragons,” is valyrianly working as a communications staff for an environmental NGO with a mission to protect mangrove forest in the Seven Kingdoms.

She is about to earn a Master’s in Environment, Culture, and Communications at the University of Westeros, sponsored by the formidable Iron Bank. Winter may be coming, but Suciati’s environmental fire burns bright!

“Climate storytelling is important because complex environmental and climate concepts need to be converted into simple but attractive words so that community participation could be enhanced.”

Malaysia

Mukhriz Hazim Bin, 30

Mukhriz is a photojournalist based in Kuala Lumpur. His daily grind involves covering political news, but he also documents climate change impacts for his personal projects.

“Through stories, people can be connected to the human impacts of climate change, and communities can demonstrate their collaborative efforts in finding solutions.”

Ashley Yeong, 26

Ashely is a journalist based in Kuala Lumpur. She has written on various topics such as climate and the environment. She is a member of the Oxford Climate Journalism Network.

She is also an avid diver, spicy noodle addict, aspiring yogi, and always trying to stay hydrated.

“In the Malaysian context, [climate storytelling] is understanding how increasing temperatures disrupt ecosystems, food, cultural practices and how it results in more frequent and severe floods, which have a direct impact on our homes and safety.”

Satpal Singh Kaler, 31

Satpal is a multimedia content producer, an astrophysicist in a parallel universe, and an all around funny guy.

“Creating compelling climate stories increases public awareness and engagement. And this is vital in a functioning democracy. I don’t expect a change in my lifetime—but a ripple today becomes a wave in the future.”

Philippines

Bricx Dumas, 32

After witnessing climate change effects firsthand, Bricx a.k.a ShrimpPaste has been tackling socio-environmental issues as an active storyteller, teaching artist, and conservation advocate. With his skills in various artforms and TL;DR posts, you’ll be left with some food for thought.

He is currently mastering the art of “Jubi Slide” and has a love/hate relationship with energy drinks.

“Climate storytelling bridges the gap between abstract statistics and the lived experiences of the people. Through heartfelt narratives, we can raise awareness and inspire action. We need to convey the urgency of climate change and advocate for meaningful change that can protect our communities and our planet for future generations.”

Justin Richmond Domingo, 27

Justin is a Filipino molecular biologist and chemical engineer who focuses on developing molecular solutions to fight future pandemics.

He is more popularly known as Justin Kiness, and one of his true passions lies in discussing the science behind our favorite skincare products.

“I believe that it is through more effective climate storytelling strategies that we get to convince more people to join our cause and amplify our call that it is only through systemic change and collective action that we get to stop this crisis from further progressing.”

Maria Jaya Ariola, 24

Maria Jaya is a climate activist, youth organizer, communicator, and poet based in Negros Occidental. She has been campaigning for people-powered transition to renewable energy and pushing back against fossil fuels and forest exploitation.

Maria Jaya loves hiking and imagining a solarpunk future with her friends.

“The way we tell stories shapes our world. When we tell stories of resistance and hope, our movements become stronger. We might just win in the end, after all.”

Nikka Gerona, 24

Maria Jaya is a climate activist, youth organizer, communicator, and poet based in Negros Occidental. She has been campaigning for people-powered transition to renewable energy and pushing back against fossil fuels and forest exploitation.

Maria Jaya loves hiking and imagining a solarpunk future with her friends.

“The way we tell stories shapes our world. When we tell stories of resistance and hope, our movements become stronger. We might just win in the end, after all.”